Five Things I Learned from Working in a Bookshop

Happy Bookshop Day! It’s a wonderful day to celebrate by supporting your local bookshop. I had the privilege of working in a bookshop not too long ago and I never documented any of my thoughts here, so here’s a quick note about a few things I learned. Continue reading “Five Things I Learned from Working in a Bookshop”

Jhumpa Lahiri on Linguistic and Cultural Hybridity

Pulitzer Prize Winner Jhumpa Lahiri spoke at the Italian Cultural Institute about language, identity, and belonging in relation to a new collection of Italian Short Stories which she has edited. As translated fiction sales are up by 5.5% in the UK this year, I’m musing upon what translated fiction adds to one’s literary diet.

I first encountered Jhumpa Lahiri’s works in the last year of my undergraduate degree, when I was studying a module about ‘postcolonial literature’ (the tutors of which quickly dissected the chosen term, as all good English Lit tutors do), and I immediately fell in love with her writing. I was enthralled by Lahiri’s prose and how naturally it slips into questions of identity, migration, and belonging – themes which greatly preoccupy me. I was therefore incredibly excited when I found that she was coming to London (all the way from Princeton) and speaking at the Italian Cultural Institute about a new collection, The Penguin Book of Italian Short Stories, which she has edited (and translated).

Continue reading “Jhumpa Lahiri on Linguistic and Cultural Hybridity”

Shelfie: Hello, Spring 2019

Hello, how are you? I’m really enjoying that the sun has come out for spring, even if I am writing this whilst sat in a cafe wearing a hat and scarf for comfort (I would appreciate it if the sun made it warm as well as sunny, but I guess we can’t have it all). Luckily I have a few books to keep me warm (emotionally… they’re not that great as blankets). I’m reading a variety of genres at the moment: graphic novels, YA, poetry and literary fiction. I’ve also joined a bookclub for the first time. Plus, as I was writing this blog post in a café a doggo came and sat next to me so obviously I’ve had to include a few pictures of him for fun. You’re welcome! Continue reading “Shelfie: Hello, Spring 2019”

Convenience Store Woman: What is ‘Normal’?

When I had the chance to hear writer Sayaka Murata speak at the Cheltenham Literature Festival, I was very excited. I’d spotted the memorable, yellow cover of Convenience Store Woman,「コンビニ人間」at the Japan Centre and on the tube a few times and was really keen to read it.

Convenience Store Woman is a heartwarming look at identity, societal expectations and pressures on women. It shares the story of a woman called Keiko who works at a convenience store in Japan – or, as most people in Japan know them, the conbini (the Japanese title actually means ‘conbini human’). Unlike most convenience store employees though, she has been working there for 18 years – since she left University in 1998. Keiko has seen seven managers pass by and her career there has outlived all of them.

Continue readingConvenience Store Woman: What is ‘Normal’?”

Kids Need to See Themselves in Books – #ReadtheOnePercent

In research funded by Arts Council England, the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education published a report which showed that only 1% of children’s books feature protagonists who are BAME. This statistic really grabbed people’s attention on Twitter and became a national headline, but for those who were already familiar with this problem, the research did not come as a surprise.

Enter Knights Of, a publishing company founded by Aimée Felone and David Stevens. They have spent the past year championing change within children’s publishing, focusing on books which are diverse and inclusive. To celebrate their 1st birthday they set up a pop-up shop in Brixton, using the hashtag #ReadTheOnePercent on social media. It was a small space which they filled with books, books and more books. And what a shop it was. The white furniture and walls allowed the colourful book covers to pop. When I walked in, I didn’t know where to look first. Continue reading “Kids Need to See Themselves in Books – #ReadtheOnePercent”

Remembering Summer: London Matsuri

Before Winter finally settles, I’m keen to remember summer one last time. (At least the memories will keep me warm!) My strongest association with a Japanese summer is the matsuri festivals. On summer evenings, in the humidity of a thirty-degree-heat, communities gather, dressed in yukata, and enjoy the festival. It usually consists of a procession and a gathering in a local square. Crowds form around the taiko drums which are often on a stage in the centre of the square and they dance, encircling the taiko drummers. Young children who dance for the first time are taught by their parents and grandparents, who push them along gently if they forget to keep moving round. The dancing is entrancing. The beat of the taiko drums is something which still enraptures me and raises the hair on my arms with excitement.

Not to mention the food! The smokey yakitori with the most delicious sauce, the ice-cold, bright, blue kakigori which gives you brain-freeze, the warming takoyaki. I was having bubble tea at matsuri festivals way before it was hipster and cool. These memories of the sounds and smells of my childhood nourish me when I am feeling homesick. Continue reading “Remembering Summer: London Matsuri”

Women in Translation Month

It’s the end of Women in Translation Month and so to celebrate, this post is dedicated to three of my favourite texts by women authors which I’ve read in translation. The aim of the month-long celebration is to draw attention to the fact that women authors are not often translated into English.

I’ve chosen three classic novels and novellas written over 30-50 years ago but I believe that they are not read or talked about enough, which is why I’m highlighting them here. Each one deeply affected me and stands out in my memory. Nawal El Saadawi and Latifa Al-Zayyat’s novels were introduced to me during my Master’s module on Arabic literature (with primarily an Egyptian focus). I found Banana Yoshimoto when I was looking for Japanese authors to read as a teenager. Continue reading “Women in Translation Month”

August: Currently Reading/TBR

I’ve got a lot of things on my to-be-read list this month, and honestly I think that this pile of books is going to take me right through September as well because I’m busy this summer writing up my dissertation for my Master’s. Also, some of the books which I’ve chosen are going to take a while to finish as they’re heavy reads, both emotionally and physically (I’m looking at you, A Little Life)! Anyway, here’s what I’m reading at the moment and aiming to start reading soon…

Also, as a quick side-note – I’m loving the Gal-dem collaboration with The Guardian from last weekend:

Gal-dem Continue reading “August: Currently Reading/TBR”

British East Asian Theatre: “I’m not a graceful lotus flower.”

One of my pet hates is when books/plays written by BAME writers are perceived or labelled as culturally ‘niche’. Why do people say that? It’s a way of othering and distancing works by writers of colour for being ‘different’. It’s alienating for BAME writers and readers/audience members when it’s difficult for minority writers to get a platform and challenge the status quo in the first place. I think that it’s necessary to deconstruct this idea that we are ‘niche’, and with that in mind, here are two products of the British East Asian theatrical community which I have really enjoyed reading recently. Foreign Goods really got me thinking: why is this the first British East Asian collection of theatrical writing? Because it’s SO good. I hope that there’s another! Continue reading “British East Asian Theatre: “I’m not a graceful lotus flower.””

Mid-year Round-up: Favourite Encounters So Far

It’s definitely heating up for summer right now (I AM MELTING as I write this) and I’m so excited to spend my time in the sun crossing titles off my summer reading list. Before that, though, here’s a quick round-up of some of the books which I’ve really enjoyed reading in 2018 so far. Continue reading “Mid-year Round-up: Favourite Encounters So Far”