Kids Need to See Themselves in Books – #ReadtheOnePercent

In research funded by Arts Council England, the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education published a report which showed that only 1% of children’s books feature protagonists who are BAME. This statistic really grabbed people’s attention on Twitter and became a national headline, but for those who were already familiar with this problem, the research did not come as a surprise.

Enter Knights Of, a publishing company founded by Aimée Felone and David Stevens. They have spent the past year championing change within children’s publishing, focusing on books which are diverse and inclusive. To celebrate their 1st birthday they set up a pop-up shop in Brixton, using the hashtag #ReadTheOnePercent on social media. It was a small space which they filled with books, books and more books. And what a shop it was. The white furniture and walls allowed the colourful book covers to pop. When I walked in, I didn’t know where to look first. Continue reading “Kids Need to See Themselves in Books – #ReadtheOnePercent”

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Remembering Summer: London Matsuri

Before Winter finally settles, I’m keen to remember summer one last time. (At least the memories will keep me warm!) My strongest association with a Japanese summer is the matsuri festivals. On summer evenings, in the humidity of a thirty-degree-heat, communities gather, dressed in yukata, and enjoy the festival. It usually consists of a procession and a gathering in a local square. Crowds form around the taiko drums which are often on a stage in the centre of the square and they dance, encircling the taiko drummers. Young children who dance for the first time are taught by their parents and grandparents, who push them along gently if they forget to keep moving round. The dancing is entrancing. The beat of the taiko drums is something which still enraptures me and raises the hair on my arms with excitement.

Not to mention the food! The smokey yakitori with the most delicious sauce, the ice-cold, bright, blue kakigori which gives you brain-freeze, the warming takoyaki. I was having bubble tea at matsuri festivals way before it was hipster and cool. These memories of the sounds and smells of my childhood nourish me when I am feeling homesick. Continue reading “Remembering Summer: London Matsuri”

I Wish I Had Seen Wendy Kweh Play Calpurnia When I Was a Kid

I was a member of the ‘mob’ audience of Nicholas Hytner’s stunning production of Julius Caesar (2018) at the Bridge Theatre, and aside from being completely blown away by the production itself and the incredible level of talent from Ben Whishaw, Michelle Farly, and the whole cast, there was one person whom I found so personally inspiring.

When Wendy Kweh graced the stage in all her elegance, I paused for breath. In that space, seeing an incredibly talented actor of Asian ethnicity onstage as a distraught Calpurnia, a realisation hit me like a wave: in all my years of growing up and going to the theatre, as far as I can recall, I had never seen an Asian actor in a professional Shakespeare play in the UK before. Moreover, I had not even realised this fact until I saw Kweh onstage, standing in front of me. I had subconsciously accepted that it did not happen – even to the extent that I had not consciously thought about it at all. Continue reading “I Wish I Had Seen Wendy Kweh Play Calpurnia When I Was a Kid”

From Shoreditch to Shanghai: Loop of Jade by Sarah Howe

During the week of International Women’s Day, I took a trip to Shoreditch to visit Penguin’s ‘Like a Woman’ pop-up bookshop, which was stocked with women authors to celebrate #IWD2018.

Like a Woman

Whilst perusing the beautifully curated bookshelves, I came across a true gem, Loop of Jade (2015) by Sarah Howe. I’ve been reading a lot of novels recently, and I was in need of a poetry-fix, so this wonderful collection really caught my eye. As a winner of the T. S. Eliot Prize in 2015, I knew that I was in for a treat. Added to that, all of my favourite things were mentioned on the blurb: ‘an enthralling exploration of self and place, migration and inheritance’. It did not disappoint, and I’ll take you through some of my favourite moments in the collection here.

Continue reading “From Shoreditch to Shanghai: Loop of Jade by Sarah Howe”

New Digs: Snow Place Like London

Hey there, it’s been a while! 久しぶりです!

Apologies for my long absence, I was busy doing Finals exams, graduating, and then settling into a new course and University (King’s College London – I’m studying for a Contemporary Literature, Culture and Theory MA). I’m loving it but it’s been a huge whirlwind so far! I have finally settled down and have time to spend writing for my blog again. I’ve missed you!

We had Artic weather in London last week – lots of snow and temperatures so low that my phone battery was constantly non-existent. If you’re reading this from continental Europe then you probably experienced the ‘Beast from the East’ too. Of course, Canadians, Finns, and anyone from anywhere else further North in the world found the British chaos rather hilarious, which I can understand given that it was only -4˚, but nevertheless it was a memorable week in 2018’s tapestry of this city. London certainly looked beautiful, despite the drama of it all, and I felt very lucky to be studying here.

Coming up next: Food adventures, books exploring biculturalism, travel journaling, hints & tips for London life, food, food, and more food.

Stay tuned! またね!

Naomi | 直美

Photo: Westminster in the snow

‘Painapurru Old Fashioned’ and Ramen

LONDON: Naomi gives 4/5 stars to Bone Daddies Kensington.

Amidst the picturesque London scene of red buses and red brick along Kensington High Street lies a new hotspot for ramen fans, hidden in the depths of Whole Foods Market. But rather than for ramen, I personally think it should be famous for their drink names which feature excellent Japlish!

Bone Daddies Kensington opened last November, the third restaurant to add to the London-based company’s portfolio. They bring their signature hirata buns and dishes such as Curry Ramen and Tonkotsu to West London.

Continue reading “‘Painapurru Old Fashioned’ and Ramen”