Jhumpa Lahiri on Linguistic and Cultural Hybridity

Pulitzer Prize Winner Jhumpa Lahiri spoke at the Italian Cultural Institute about language, identity, and belonging in relation to a new collection of Italian Short Stories which she has edited. As translated fiction sales are up by 5.5% in the UK this year, I’m musing upon what translated fiction adds to one’s literary diet.

I first encountered Jhumpa Lahiri’s works in the last year of my undergraduate degree, when I was studying a module about ‘postcolonial literature’ (the tutors of which quickly dissected the chosen term, as all good English Lit tutors do), and I immediately fell in love with her writing. I was enthralled by Lahiri’s prose and how naturally it slips into questions of identity, migration, and belonging – themes which greatly preoccupy me. I was therefore incredibly excited when I found that she was coming to London (all the way from Princeton) and speaking at the Italian Cultural Institute about a new collection, The Penguin Book of Italian Short Stories, which she has edited (and translated).

Continue reading “Jhumpa Lahiri on Linguistic and Cultural Hybridity”

Women in Translation Month

It’s the end of Women in Translation Month and so to celebrate, this post is dedicated to three of my favourite texts by women authors which I’ve read in translation. The aim of the month-long celebration is to draw attention to the fact that women authors are not often translated into English.

I’ve chosen three classic novels and novellas written over 30-50 years ago but I believe that they are not read or talked about enough, which is why I’m highlighting them here. Each one deeply affected me and stands out in my memory. Nawal El Saadawi and Latifa Al-Zayyat’s novels were introduced to me during my Master’s module on Arabic literature (with primarily an Egyptian focus). I found Banana Yoshimoto when I was looking for Japanese authors to read as a teenager. Continue reading “Women in Translation Month”